Underwater lung
Your average lung capacity is about 6 litres of air. But even after exhaling there will still be a residual volume of a little over a litre. This is a piece of pig lung being held underwater and squeezed, you can see the bubbles of air leaving the bronchiole tubes from the bottom. Check out the full lung dissection here: http://youtu.be/9xhxALk9gm8
(via Ross Exton)
Don’t forget to check out Ross Exton’s blog!

Underwater lung

Your average lung capacity is about 6 litres of air. But even after exhaling there will still be a residual volume of a little over a litre. This is a piece of pig lung being held underwater and squeezed, you can see the bubbles of air leaving the bronchiole tubes from the bottom. Check out the full lung dissection here: http://youtu.be/9xhxALk9gm8

(via Ross Exton)

Don’t forget to check out Ross Exton’s blog!

prostheticknowledge:

BionicKangaroo

Robotic recreation of the Kangaroo form put together by Festo to demonstrate energy-efficient movement (this was initially announced on April the 1st, but turns out to be real) - video embedded below:

With the BionicKangaroo, Festo has technologically reproduced the unique way a kangaroo moves. Like its natural model, it can recover the energy when jumping, store it and efficiently use it for the next jump.

On the artificial kangaroo, Festo intelligently combines pneumatic and electrical drive technology to produce a highly dynamic system. The stable jump kinematics plus the precise control technology ensure stability when jumping and landing. The consistent lightweight construction facilitates the unique jumping behaviour. The system is controlled by gestures.

More Here

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea saltGreen = organicsRed = dustWhite = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea salt
Green = organics
Red = dust
White = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.