Which lands first… the chicken or the egg?
If a chicken & egg are simultaneously dropped from the same height - which will hit the ground first? Well, actually, it’s a draw in this gravitational race. If two objects with different masses are simultaneously dropped from the same height, they will both hit the ground at the same time.
This is because of the difference in inertia - objects with a greater mass require more energy to get them going. The ratio between mass and interia is the same for everything & balances out - therefore everything experiences the same acceleration due to gravity.
Find out more in this source video: http://youtu.be/bHsQ3V2AmEE

Which lands first… the chicken or the egg?

If a chicken & egg are simultaneously dropped from the same height - which will hit the ground first? Well, actually, it’s a draw in this gravitational race. If two objects with different masses are simultaneously dropped from the same height, they will both hit the ground at the same time.

This is because of the difference in inertia - objects with a greater mass require more energy to get them going. The ratio between mass and interia is the same for everything & balances out - therefore everything experiences the same acceleration due to gravity.

Find out more in this source video: http://youtu.be/bHsQ3V2AmEE

Cakes rising
What happens if you leave out a vital ingredient from your cake? In this image you can see a time-lapse of four cakes, but only one of them has all of the necessary ingredients. No margarine means that there is no fat to coat the protein within the egg, meaning more gluten & a thicker cake. No egg means that there is not protein structure to contain expanding gases. No baking powder means there is no excess carbon dioxide to help your cake to rise. Find out more about the science of baking cakes & see what these different batches look like on the inside in this source video: http://youtu.be/MBouLt-hXDU

Ross Exton and the atbristol team are back in the kitchen again: this time with cake!

Cakes rising

What happens if you leave out a vital ingredient from your cake? In this image you can see a time-lapse of four cakes, but only one of them has all of the necessary ingredients. No margarine means that there is no fat to coat the protein within the egg, meaning more gluten & a thicker cake. No egg means that there is not protein structure to contain expanding gases. No baking powder means there is no excess carbon dioxide to help your cake to rise. Find out more about the science of baking cakes & see what these different batches look like on the inside in this source video: http://youtu.be/MBouLt-hXDU

Ross Exton and the atbristol team are back in the kitchen again: this time with cake!

robotkitsch:

coolsciencegifs:

Refractive Indexes and Invisibility (A real-life magic trick)

When light refracts from two different substances with the same index of refraction, the materials cannot be distinguished from one another. Here, Pyrex and vegetable oil have the same index of refraction so that the test tube appears invisible in vegetable oil. The light isn’t bouncing off  off of the pyrex tube, just travelling straight through. 

However, water and pyrex have a very different refractive index. The light travelling through the water refracts off the pyrex and reflects back in to your eye, so it does not appear invisible. 

When you see the pyrex test tube under the oil, you are actually just viewing the air inside it before it becomes filled as the pyrex itself is invisible.

source

Second chance Sunday!

More stuff about refraction from Cool Science GIFs for second chance Sunday

Invisible test tube
Placing a test tube into a beaker of glycerol can make it turn invisible! How? A trick of the light. You can still see a transparent test tube placed in water as light passing through the different materials is bent & refracted. But if you switch the water for something with the same refractive properties as the glass of the test tube, the light passes straight through without refracting, thus appearing invisible. Learn how to perform this scientific magic trick at home in this video: http://youtu.be/UIovk_LgHRA
(via @RossExton)

Invisible test tube

Placing a test tube into a beaker of glycerol can make it turn invisible! How? A trick of the light. You can still see a transparent test tube placed in water as light passing through the different materials is bent & refracted. But if you switch the water for something with the same refractive properties as the glass of the test tube, the light passes straight through without refracting, thus appearing invisible. Learn how to perform this scientific magic trick at home in this video: http://youtu.be/UIovk_LgHRA

(via @RossExton)

corbinharris91 asked:

Why haven't you posted anything in awhile I love your blog and all the cool stuff I've learned following you and others with blogs like yours

Thank you very much! I’ve been very ill the past few months and haven’t been able to post, but now and again I can get to it. I’ve been out of the Cool Science GIFS lab so I haven’t got as much original content to share right now. But watch this space!

Dough rising
When making a loaf of bread, yeast is mixed into the dough to help it rise. These living micro-organisms begin anaerobic respiration - converting glucose into ethanol and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide gas is trapped by the gluten matrix of the dough, causing it to rise and take shape. After two hours of ‘proving’, the dough is ready to put into the oven and set the structure in place as it bakes. Find out more about the science of how to make bread in the source video: http://youtu.be/tSNvmr41RSQ

Dough rising

When making a loaf of bread, yeast is mixed into the dough to help it rise. These living micro-organisms begin anaerobic respiration - converting glucose into ethanol and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide gas is trapped by the gluten matrix of the dough, causing it to rise and take shape. After two hours of ‘proving’, the dough is ready to put into the oven and set the structure in place as it bakes. Find out more about the science of how to make bread in the source video: http://youtu.be/tSNvmr41RSQ

Miniature Lightning
A Van de Graff generator works by creating a large static positive charge on a metal dome. When a metal ‘wand’ connected to the earth is brought into close proximity to the dome, negatively charged electrons jump the gap, creating a blue spark. For more on how you can use static charge & how to use a Van de Graff generator to make a ‘lightsaber' check out the source video: http://youtu.be/0OczYKJPNps

Miniature Lightning

A Van de Graff generator works by creating a large static positive charge on a metal dome. When a metal ‘wand’ connected to the earth is brought into close proximity to the dome, negatively charged electrons jump the gap, creating a blue spark. For more on how you can use static charge & how to use a Van de Graff generator to make a ‘lightsaber' check out the source video: http://youtu.be/0OczYKJPNps

Burning Metal
You might think that metal isn’t flammable, but if you can get it hot enough & expose it to enough oxygen, it’s easy. Here you can see some steel wool which has been heated to over 700 degrees celcius, using nothing but a battery. How? Find out in this video which shows you what you need to perform this beautiful science experiment at home: http://youtu.be/jCbj6tjCKIo

Burning Metal

You might think that metal isn’t flammable, but if you can get it hot enough & expose it to enough oxygen, it’s easy. Here you can see some steel wool which has been heated to over 700 degrees celcius, using nothing but a battery. How? Find out in this video which shows you what you need to perform this beautiful science experiment at home: http://youtu.be/jCbj6tjCKIo